Category Archives: Nano-metre Scale

The knowledge superpower – 2

Nanotechnology, with the ability of providing tools to control, manipulate and construct materials at nano-metre scales, in combination with bio, promises unique solution in diseases like cancer. Khandelwal Laboratories has developed a patented technology on Gene Repair Therapy to stimulate dormant genes to cure diseases like cancer and AIDS and promoting research in nanodrug and drug delivery techniques.

The penetration of ICT to grassroots levels, achieved by voice, video and data networks have been phenomenal. Indian Railways’ Passenger Reservation System is a notable example.

Satellite mapping tool ‘Bhuvan’ that is getting ready at ISRO is going to have a great impact on general public and in addressing problems like floods, famines, infrastructure development, education and so on. This will contribute to synergetic application.

India’s space programme operates one of the largest domestic communication satellite systems and the largest constellation of remote sensing satellites built indigenously. Nearly 211 transponders of INSAT and GSAT communication satellites support a variety of communication and broadcasting applications including telemedicine and distance education.

Similarly, Indian remote sensing satellites provide a host of societal and natural resource management inputs in areas relating to agriculture, forestry, water resources and ocean studies to name a few. Meteorological data from geosynchronous satellites like Kalpana are critical to weather prediction and disaster management.

Ref: thetimesofindia

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The knowledge superpower

Science and technology have played a pivotal role in embarking the country on a mission to reach equality with the rest of the world. In post-independence India, Nehru set the tone for scientific and technological progress with the early steps of establishing institutions like the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research as well as those dedicated to higher education and research.

Today there are government departments and privately funded institutions dedicated to advancement of science and technology in various disciplines. This article will highlight examples of pioneering and path breaking advances in Indian science and technology that have either already made a mark or bear the promise of doing so.

In bio-technology sector, India has emerged as one of the top five leaders in the Asia-Pacific region. Indian biopharma and the agri-biotech industries have notched up significant success, being the largest vaccine producer in the world and the largest cultivator of Bt cotton.

Bio-informatics has created extensive electronic databases on several biological systems, after biopharma and agri-biotech industries and is the third in revenue generation. India’s biotech sector today comprises 350 firms generating nearly $2 billion in revenue and is estimated to grow into a $5 billion enterprise by 2010.

Nanotechnology, with the ability of providing tools to control, manipulate and construct materials at nano-metre scales, in combination with bio, promises unique solution in diseases like cancer. Khandelwal Laboratories has developed a patented technology on Gene Repair Therapy to stimulate dormant genes to cure diseases like cancer and AIDS and promoting research in nanodrug and drug delivery techniques.

The penetration of ICT to grassroots levels, achieved by voice, video and data networks have been phenomenal. Indian Railways’ Passenger Reservation System is a notable example.

Satellite mapping tool ‘Bhuvan’ that is getting ready at ISRO is going to have a great impact on general public and in addressing problems like floods, famines, infrastructure development, education and so on. This will contribute to synergetic application.

India’s space programme operates one of the largest domestic communication satellite systems and the largest constellation of remote sensing satellites built indigenously. Nearly 211 transponders of INSAT and GSAT communication satellites support a variety of communication and broadcasting applications including telemedicine and distance education.

Similarly, Indian remote sensing satellites provide a host of societal and natural resource management inputs in areas relating to agriculture, forestry, water resources and ocean studies to name a few. Meteorological data from geosynchronous satellites like Kalpana are critical to weather prediction and disaster management.