Category Archives: Human Rights

Right-To-Die – A lesson from Brittany Maynard’s Death -01

I just publish Brittany Maynard’s Death with her own choice as Right To Die. I like to talk here in India about this.

Do we need this in India? does our elder people who are suffering from life threatening medical illness needs this? does it going to help those people who are suffering from life threat in their 20s or 30s or 40s or 50s?

Its time for all of us to think about it. A Death with Dignity. A Death with Peace of Mind. i like to put those words of Brittany Maynard’s which she wrote in her note which i published in my previous post……

” Now that I’ve had the prescription filled and it’s in my possession, I have experienced a tremendous sense of relief.
And if I decide to change my mind about taking the medication, I will not take it.

Having this choice at the end of my life has become incredibly important. It has given me a sense of peace during a tumultuous time that otherwise would be dominated by fear, uncertainty and pain.

Now, I’m able to move forward in my remaining days or weeks I have on this beautiful Earth, to seek joy and love and to spend time traveling to outdoor wonders of nature with those I love. And I know that I have a safety net.

i am sure she is able to say these because she decide to go with Death with Dignity. she experienced a tremendous sense of relief. isn’t this is one of the best thing one should have who is going to die?

Let’s understand the pain of people who are facing such conditions and let give them choice to have Death with Dignity…….

D

Right-To-Die – A lesson from Brittany Maynard’s Death

We all are talking about Right To Information, Right To Education, Right To Food, Human Rights etc etc. One event happen on November 01, 2014 brings it back to talk Right To Die. A word that is very difficult to digest and even talk in India.

A note on what had happen on November 01, 2014.

Brittany Maynard, terminally ill with brain cancer, was in the national spotlight for about a month after publicizing that she and her husband, Dan Diaz, moved to Portland from Northern California so that she could use the Oregon law to end her life on her own terms. Maynard told journalists she planned to die Nov. 1, and followed through on Saturday. She was 29.

Here is her what she had said about her decision

My right to death with dignity at 29 

This is what she wrote ( from http://edition.cnn.com/2014/10/07/opinion/maynard-assisted-suicide-cancer-dignity/ )

On New Year’s Day, after months of suffering from debilitating headaches, I learned that I had brain cancer.

I was 29 years old. I’d been married for just over a year. My husband and I were trying for a family.

Our lives devolved into hospital stays, doctor consultations and medical research. Nine days after my initial diagnoses, I had a partial craniotomy and a partial resection of my temporal lobe. Both surgeries were an effort to stop the growth of my tumor.

In April, I learned that not only had my tumor come back, but it was more aggressive. Doctors gave me a prognosis of six months to live.
Because my tumor is so large, doctors prescribed full brain radiation. I read about the side effects: The hair on my scalp would have been singed off. My scalp would be left covered with first-degree burns. My quality of life, as I knew it, would be gone.
After months of research, my family and I reached a heartbreaking conclusion: There is no treatment that would save my life, and the recommended treatments would have destroyed the time I had left.
I considered passing away in hospice care at my San Francisco Bay-area home. But even with palliative medication, I could develop potentially morphine-resistant pain and suffer personality changes and verbal, cognitive and motor loss of virtually any kind.

Because the rest of my body is young and healthy, I am likely to physically hang on for a long time even though cancer is eating my mind. I probably would have suffered in hospice care for weeks or even months. And my family would have had to watch that.
I did not want this nightmare scenario for my family, so I started researching death with dignity. It is an end-of-life option for mentally competent, terminally ill patients with a prognosis of six months or less to live. It would enable me to use the medical practice of aid in dying: I could request and receive a prescription from a physician for medication that I could self-ingest to end my dying process if it becomes unbearable.
I quickly decided that death with dignity was the best option for me and my family.
We had to uproot from California to Oregon, because Oregon is one of only five states where death with dignity is authorized.
I met the criteria for death with dignity in Oregon, but establishing residency in the state to make use of the law required a monumental number of changes. I had to find new physicians, establish residency in Portland, search for a new home, obtain a new driver’s license, change my voter registration and enlist people to take care of our animals, and my husband, Dan, had to take a leave of absence from his job. The vast majority of families do not have the flexibility, resources and time to make all these changes.

I’ve had the medication for weeks. I am not suicidal. If I were, I would have consumed that medication long ago. I do not want to die. But I am dying. And I want to die on my own terms.

I would not tell anyone else that he or she should choose death with dignity. My question is: Who has the right to tell me that I don’t deserve this choice? That I deserve to suffer for weeks or months in tremendous amounts of physical and emotional pain? Why should anyone have the right to make that choice for me?

Now that I’ve had the prescription filled and it’s in my possession, I have experienced a tremendous sense of relief. And if I decide to change my mind about taking the medication, I will not take it.

Having this choice at the end of my life has become incredibly important. It has given me a sense of peace during a tumultuous time that otherwise would be dominated by fear, uncertainty and pain.
Now, I’m able to move forward in my remaining days or weeks I have on this beautiful Earth, to seek joy and love and to spend time traveling to outdoor wonders of nature with those I love. And I know that I have a safety net.

I plan to celebrate my husband’s birthday on October 26 with him and our family. Unless my condition improves dramatically, I will look to pass soon thereafter.

I hope for the sake of my fellow American citizens that I’ll never meet that this option is available to you. If you ever find yourself walking a mile in my shoes, I hope that you would at least be given the same choice and that no one tries to take it from you.

When my suffering becomes too great, I can say to all those I love, “I love you; come be by my side, and come say goodbye as I pass into whatever’s next.” I will die upstairs in my bedroom with my husband, mother, stepfather and best friend by my side and pass peacefully. I can’t imagine trying to rob anyone else of that choice.

Come Together

Good morning friends.  After my morning walk, as i was about to take my breakfast I read one news and it gives my attention to it.  As i was saying before, what happened to Mumbai is not the end of everything.  We should all be together with this problem which arises.We mush unite all.

Citizens get proactive to demonstrate solidarity and heal wounds.

CandleElight vigils, human chains, prayer meetings to mourn the dead and art exhibitions dedicated to the victims. Mumbai reacts and mourns the loss of life and the terror attacks that ravaged the city for three days non-stop.

On Friday night a group of concerned citizens, NGOs got together to meet in Goregaon, under the umbrella name Mumbai For Peace. Consisting of many organisations the plan is to stage an action to forge solidarity and unity amongst the people of Mumbai.

“We plan to form a human chain across the city, like people did during the ’93 riots in the city,” says Cubby Sherman, an activist and documentary filmmaker who attended the meeting.

“Combating terrorism needs political will, not a military solution or short term measures like draconian laws, CCTVs and metal detectors. The deeper roots of various kinds of terror need to be understood and dealt with. A solution would involve, among other things, the settlement of underlying and deep-seated, long-standing conflicts: India-Pakistan, Kashmir, communalism, and attacks on minorities. We totally reject ‘jehad’ in the name of Islam, Hindutva ‘revenge terrorism’ and all forms of violence which brutalize society,” writes the Mumbai For Peace committee.

While the plans are still being set in place and final organizing decisions need to be made, the Human Chain will stretch across the city on December 10, which is recognised as International Human Rights Day.

“Let’s show them how many we are and how tired and frustrated we are. Let’s all come together at the Gateway of India, this coming Wednesday at 6 pm. Let’s ask for what is our right: to live fearlessly,” so reads an SMS forwarded by concerned citizen Nakul K who walked out of Leopold ten minutes before the terror attacks broke out.

“One must express the wave of emotion that is surging through us now. Everybody is raging with anger. We are a broken people now; we are at an all time low now and not feeling resilient,” says Nakul who has also put up the message on Facebook.

Besides the public demonstrations and SMS chains that are being sent around, the internet is another avenue for spreading a positive message and keeping the peace.

Avaaz.org, one of whose trustees is Gerson Da Cunha of AGNI, is a new global web movement that has a simple democratic mission: to close the gap between the worlds we have, and the world most people everywhere want. The movement is sending a

forwarded message to all those on email.

“The attacks were aimed at our people, our prosperity and our peace. But their top target was something else: our unity. If these attacks cause us to turn on each other in hatred and conflict, the terrorists will have won. Let’s deny them that victory,” reads the mail.