Tag Archives: Cricket

Tendulkar joins 100-catch club

My favorit start Sachine Tendulkar joins 100-catch club. It’s record for 100 number of catches in a test career. Sachin Tendulkar joined the list of players who have taken 100 or more catches in Test cricket when he pouched a dolly offered to him at mid-on by Australian wicketkeeper-batsman Brad Haddin on the last day of the fourth and final Test in Nagpur on Monday.

 

 

The batting maestro, who holds several batting records in Tests and ODIs, reached the milestone in his 154th Test to follow compatriots Rahul Dravid (179), Sunil Gavaskar (108), VVS Laxman and Mohd Azharuddin (105) into the record book.

 

The world record for the most number of catches in a Test career, 181 in 128 matches, stands in the name of Mark Waugh of Australia.

Sachin hits 40th Test ton, puts India in driver’s seat

Good Evening friends, another century from my favorite cricket legend Sachin Tendulkar. He hit his 40th Test century. Congratulations to Sachin. Read complete update I read at yahoo india site.

Sachin Tendulkar gave glimpses of his vintage form by cracking his 40th Test century which had eluded him for long as India recovered from early jolts to push for a big total in the fourth and final cricket Test against Australia in Nagpur on Thursday.

 

The 35-year-old Tendulkar stole the limelight with a flurry of strokes and capitalised on two dropped catches to pull the team out of the pits and steer the visitors to a comfortable 311 for five at close on the opening day.

 

It was a huge relief for Tendulkar who had gone without a century for the last 15 Tests and faced some anxious moments before completing the milestone. The champion batsman had his share of luck as he was first dropped by Mitchell Johnson when on 85 and then by Brett Lee on 96 and faced some nervous moments before completing the century, his tenth against the Australians. His last century had also come against the Aussies — 153 in the fourth and final Test in Adelaide in January this year.

 

Tendulkar thus overtook Allan Border of Australia in the number of plus-50 scores in his career 91 (including 39 tons) as compared to the former Australian captain’s 90.

ICC pays Bradman rich tributes

Hello friends, Good Evening, it’s already 6-10 pm here. I just come across this. ICC pays rich tribute to Sir Donald Bradman. As I love the game of cricket and I have very high respect for Sir Bradman,, I want to share this with you all.

ICC President David Morgan on Wednesday paid tribute to Donald Bradman on the occasion of the Australian’s birth centenary and said the legend’s name has become a by-word even for the uninitiated.

 

“No name in cricket conjures up such widespread awe and respect as that of Sir Donald Bradman,” said Morgan.

 

“Even people with just a passing knowledge of the game or in countries where he never played will invariably recognise the name Bradman as a by-word for brilliance…Soccer has Pele and cricket has Bradman,” he added.

 

Looking back at Bradman’s awe-inspiring career, the ICC chief said, “Even now, 60 years after his final Test match and with time to put his achievements into context, his batting average of 99.94 still seems scarcely believable, especially when one compares it to those of the many other players to have graced the game at the highest level.

 

“This centenary offers us an opportunity to reflect upon the role the Don played in popularising the game through his attacking style of batting,” he added.

 

Morgan also took the occasion to point out that Bradman was much more than just the best batsman the game has ever seen.

 

“…he was a captain too, he looked to lead as he played, in a positive manner, and his 1948 side including the likes of Keith Miller, Neil Harvey, Arthur Morris and Ray Lindwall is rightly remembered as one of the greatest line-ups of all time.

 

“We should also remember the way he gave back to the game after he finished playing, as a selector and as an administrator with the Australian Cricket Board and the Imperial Cricket Conference,” he said.

 

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Dhoni back at No. 1 in ODI rankings

Good news for me and my country people that Dhoni the indicant cricket team skipper is again on TOP of ICC ranking. I read it on ndtv’s website.

 

India skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni toppled his South African counterpart Greame Smith to regain the top spot in the latest ICC ranking for ODI batsmen.

 

By virtue of his consistent performance, including 76 and 71 in the pevious two one-dayers of the on-going ODI series against Sri Lanka, Dhoni has 803 rating points in his kitty, 27 points higher than Smith who occupies the second spot.

 

Dhoni had previously occupied the number one position for a brief period in 2006.

 

Australia captain Ricky Ponting is in the third spot with 751 points followed by team-mate Michael Hussey and England skipper Kevin Pietersen.

 

Master blaster Sachin Tendulkar is placed the ninth while an out of form Yuvraj Singh is languishing at 18th.

 

Meanwhile, comeback man Zaheer Khan is the lone Indian bowler in the top 20 ODI bowlers chart in the 14th spot with 642 rating points.

 

Australia’s Nathan Bracken leads the table, followed by Kiwi skipper Daniel Vettori, team-mate Shane Bond, England youngster Stuart Broad and Sri Lankan spin wizard Muttiah Muralitharan.

 

However, no Indian representation is there in the all-rounders chart which is being led by Pakistan skipper Shaoib Malik. England’s Andrew Flintoff and Kiwi Jacob Oram find themselves in the second and third position respectively.

 

Although India has already pocketed the five-match ODI series against the Lankans with one match to go, but it didn’t help Twenty20 World Champions to move up the ODI championship table as they find themselves in the fourth spot.

 

Australia continued to lead the pack, followed by South Africa and New Zealand.

 

 

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Sir Donald Bradman -3

Bush cricketer

In 1920–21, Bradman acted as scorer for the local Bowral team, captained by his uncle George Whatman, and once filled in when the team was short of players, scoring 37 not out. During the season, Bradman’s father took him to the Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG) to watch the fifth Ashes Test match. On that day, Bradman formed an ambition. “I shall never be satisfied”, he told his father, “until I play on this ground”. Bradman left school in 1922 and went to work for a local real estate agent who encouraged his sporting pursuits by giving him time off when necessary. He gave up cricket in favour of tennis for two years, but resumed playing cricket in 1925–26.

 

Bradman became a regular selection for the Bowral team; several outstanding performances earned him the attention of the Sydney daily press. Competing on matting-over-concrete pitches, Bowral played other rural towns in the Berrima District competition. Against Wingello, a team that included the future Test bowler Bill O’Reilly, Bradman made 234. In the competition final against Moss Vale, which extended over five consecutive Saturdays, Bradman scored 320 not out. During the following Australian winter (1926), an ageing Australian team lost The Ashes in England, and a number of Test players retired.

 

The New South Wales Cricket Association began a hunt for new talent. Mindful of Bradman’s big scores for Bowral, the association wrote to him, requesting his attendance at a practice session in Sydney. He was subsequently chosen for the “Country Week” tournaments at both cricket and tennis, to be played during separate weeks. His boss presented him with an ultimatum: he could have only one week away from work, and therefore had to choose between the two sports. He chose cricket. Bradman’s performances during Country Week resulted in an invitation to play grade cricket in Sydney for St George in the 1926–27 season. He scored 110 on his debut, making his first century on a turf wicket. On 1 January 1927, he turned out for the NSW second team. For the remainder of the season, Bradman travelled the 130 kilometres (81 mi) from Bowral to Sydney every Saturday to play for St George.

 

 

Sir Donald Bradman -2

Youth and early career

Donald Bradman was the youngest child of George and Emily (née Whatman) Bradman, and was born on 27 August 1908 at Cootamundra, New South Wales (NSW). He had a brother, Victor, and three sisters—Islet, Lilian and Elizabeth May. When Bradman was about two-and-a-half years old, his parents moved to Bowral in the NSW Southern Highlands.

 

Bradman practised batting incessantly during his youth. He invented his own solo cricket game, using a cricket stump for a bat, and a golf ball. A water tank, mounted on a curved brick stand, stood on a paved area behind the family home. When hit into the curved brick facing of the stand, the ball rebounded at high speed and varying angles—and Bradman would attempt to hit it again. This form of practice developed his timing and reactions to a high degree. In more formal cricket, he hit his first century at the age of 12, playing for Bowral Public School against Mittagong High School. 

 

Bush cricketer

In 1920–21, Bradman acted as scorer for the local Bowral team, captained by his uncle George Whatman, and once filled in when the team was short of players, scoring 37 not out. During the season, Bradman’s father took him to the Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG) to watch the fifth Ashes Test match. On that day, Bradman formed an ambition. “I shall never be satisfied”, he told his father, “until I play on this ground”. Bradman left school in 1922 and went to work for a local real estate agent who encouraged his sporting pursuits by giving him time off when necessary. He gave up cricket in favour of tennis for two years, but resumed playing cricket in 1925–26.

 

 

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Sir Donald Bradman -1

Today is Wednesday, August 27, 2008, is Sir Donald Bradman’s birthday.  Sir Donald Bradman was greatest batsman from Australia. Cricket is one of my most favorite sports. I like to let everyone know about Sir Donald Bradman.

 

Sir Donald George Bradman, AC (27 August 1908 – 25 February 2001), often referred to as The Don, was an Australian cricketer, widely acknowledged as the greatest batsman of all time. Bradman’s career Test batting average of 99.94 has been claimed to be statistically the greatest achievement in any major sport.

 

The story that the young Bradman practised alone with a cricket stump and a golf ball is part of Australian folklore. Bradman’s meteoric rise from bush cricket to the Australian Test team took just over two years. Before his 22nd birthday, he had set many records for high scoring, some of which still stand, and became Australia’s sporting idol at the height of the Great Depression.

 

During a 20-year playing career, Bradman consistently scored at a level that made him, in the words of former Australia captain Bill Woodfull, “worth three batsmen to Australia”. A controversial set of tactics, known as Bodyline, was specifically devised by the England team to curb his scoring. As a captain and administrator Bradman was committed to attacking, entertaining cricket; he drew spectators in record numbers. He found the constant adulation anathema, however, and it affected how he dealt with others. The focus of attention on his individual performances strained relationships with some team-mates, administrators and journalists, who thought him aloof and wary. Following an enforced hiatus, due to the Second World War, he made a dramatic comeback, captaining an Australian team known as “The Invincibles” on a record-breaking unbeaten tour of England.

 

A complex, highly-driven man, not given to close personal relationships, Bradman retained a pre-eminent position in the game by acting as an administrator, selector and writer for three decades following his retirement. Even after he became reclusive in his declining years his opinion was highly sought, and his status as a national icon was still recognised—more than 50 years after his retirement as a Test player, in 2001, the Australian Prime Minister John Howard called him the “greatest living Australian”. Bradman’s image has appeared on postage stamps and coins, and he was the first living Australian to have a museum dedicated to his life. On the centenary of his birth, 27 August 2008, the Royal Australian Mint issued a $5 commemorative gold coin with his image.

 

 

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